What’s religious about it?

Christmas is round the corner – the streets are lit up, people have a spring in their steps, shopping goes on in a frenzy. Santa is charming his way into the hearts of thousands of children. Though, the origins of the festival are religious in nature, I don’t see any religious bearings about it now. I feel like partaking in the celebration, though I don’t visit Church.

The same can be said about Diwali – the festival of lights in India. The origins of the festival had religious bearings, but today it is more of a merry time with lots of sweets, time with family, new clothes and ornaments. The whole community feels inclined to partake in the celebrations.

Since most of the fun about festivals is the fact that the community enjoys it as a whole, when people migrate to another part of the world, is it but natural for them to adapt to the new festivals? Why can’t my Diwali be celebrated around Thanksgiving time in the US? I’ll start my own tradition of Onion sambhar and piping hot idlis for Thanksgiving dinner (with laddoos for dessert)! That gives us ample time with family, and opens up the festive mood. Every so often, I find myself rushing home from work to celebrate Krishna Jayanthi, Diwali & Pongal. I would like to morph Navarathri with Christmas. I could innovate my idol display with Christmas day decorations, and have cows, sheep and camels squatting under my X-mas tree!

Or…..I could just continue doing what I am doing now. Celebrate everything – be it Thanksgiving or Diwali, Krishna Jayanthi or Christmas, Navarathri, Tamil New Year, English New Year, Easter, Karthigai and many, many more! If being happy is the motive of these festivals, why not take every conceivable occasion to spread joy?!

Happy Holiday Season to Everybody – HO HO HO!!!

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4 thoughts on “What’s religious about it?”

  1. Well said. Interestingly there is a issue going on about not saying “Merry christmas” and saying “Happy HOlidays”

  2. Well said. Interestingly there is a issue going on about not saying “Merry christmas” and saying “Happy HOlidays”

  3. I like festivals back in India. I still remember the smell of the new dresses, home-made sweets and the joy of lighting crackers. I dont have that “holiday spirit” anymore.

    Somewhere in evergreen area (san jose), I heard that several Indians have bought houses close to each other (almost the entire street/court) and apparently, they celebrate Indian festivals together. That was interesting…

  4. I like festivals back in India. I still remember the smell of the new dresses, home-made sweets and the joy of lighting crackers. I dont have that “holiday spirit” anymore.

    Somewhere in evergreen area (san jose), I heard that several Indians have bought houses close to each other (almost the entire street/court) and apparently, they celebrate Indian festivals together. That was interesting…

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